Course Descriptions

In addition to webinars, the IACA offers the following in person and online classes. To host an IACA class, please read through the hosting requirements listed here.

If you have developed training curriculum and are interested in developing that material into an IACA class, please contact the Training Director at training@iaca.net. If you have developed training curriculum and are interested in developing that material into an IACA class, please contact the Training Director at training@iaca.net.

Computer Applications for Crime Analysis

4.5 days (In Person)

Computer Applications is a four and a half-day, hands-on workshop in Microsoft Access, Excel, Word, and PowerPoint (with the majority of the time spent on the first two applications). Through a series of realistic lessons, analysts learn how to use the full potential of these programs for tactical, strategic, and administrative analysis.

Included are creating and querying databases with Access; statistics, charting, and data analysis with Excel; desktop publishing (crime bulletins and reports) with Word; and effective presentations with PowerPoint.

This class is intended for the beginner or intermediate user.

Texts: course materials provided

Crime Analysis for Smaller Jurisdictions

2 days (In Person)

Crime Analysis for Smaller Jurisdictions is a two-day workshop designed to provide an introduction to Crime Analysis and an understanding of its application within smaller jurisdictions. Students learn how to design, fund, establish, and staff a crime analysis unit for a smaller jurisdiction.

This class will focus on jurisdictions where the analysis is being done by a police officer (in addition to his/her regular duties), a Chief, a Commander, a new analyst or a part time analyst in jurisdictions with less than 125 officers. The class content will include presentations and discussions on various policing philosophies/models, basic levels of analysis, basic products and the use of commonly held software programs.

Texts: All course materials provided

Crime Mapping & Analysis

4.5 days (In Person)

Crime Mapping is a hands-on computer-based course that covers the fundamentals of mapping crime for tactical, strategic, administrative, and operations analysis. After a review of the terminology and concepts of crime mapping, the class plunges directly into hands-on exercises using ArcGIS.

Students learn how to explore base maps, import or link to police data, geocode addresses, perform spatial and attribute queries, create thematic maps, interpret crime maps, and create effective mapping products.

Note: This class requires a computer lab with ArcMap installed.

Texts: All course materials provided

Criminal Investigative Analysis

12 weeks (Online)

The objective of this course is to gain an understanding of criminal investigative analysis/criminal profiling. This course will examine factors that influence serious violent criminals and their behavior. Throughout this course students will learn the history and methods of criminal investigative analysis/criminal profiling, how to analyze crime scenes for offender behaviors and characteristics utilizing critical thinking, science and logical reasoning. Students will examine various case studies each week focusing on MO/Signature, crime scene behaviors, and crime linkage. This 12-week course will focus on offender typologies, patterns and motives of criminals, offender profiles and the psychological make-up of serial violent offenders.
Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade.

Texts: Students must purchase their own textbook: Profiling and Serial Crime: Theoretical and Practical Issues, Third Edition, Wayne Petherick. (ISBN 978-1-45-573174-9)

Essential Skills I

12 weeks (Online)

In this 12-week online course, students will work through the first half of the IACA book entitled “Exploring Crime Analysis.” The topics covered in this class include an overview of the fundamentals of crime analysis, understanding the criminal justice system, different law enforcement models, understanding criminal behavior, law enforcement data and crime analysis data sources, Internet resources, data integrity, qualitative analysis, interpreting crime data and statistics. The lessons will cover concepts, techniques, theories, and skills most useful to crime analysts.

Students successfully completing this pass/fail class will develop and/or enhance their skills toolbox. Though this class is not self-paced, students in the class do not meet live at any given time. Rather, assignments, discussion questions/board, a self-grading quiz, PowerPoints, lecture notes, etc. are provided each week covering a given chapter. Students then have a full week to read the weekly course materials, respond on the discussion board, take the quiz, review other materials, links and articles provided, and to submit a weekly assignment. NOTE: This class will be of great interest and specifically benefit those preparing to test for IACA Certification.

Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade. Essential Skills I and II are independent of each other so can be taken in any order.

Texts: Exploring Crime Analysis: Readings on Essential Skills. 3rd Edition (2017) ISBN: 978-1977937186 (Students will need to purchase prior to course start date. See http://iaca.net/exploring_crime_analysis.asp for more info)

Essential Skills II

12 weeks (Online)

In this 12-week online course, students will work through the second half of the IACA book entitled “Exploring Crime Analysis.” The topics covered in this class include spreadsheet operations, temporal analysis, intelligence analysis and charting, crime mapping, spatial analysis and forecasting, effective crime analysis writing and publications, applied crime series analysis and organized crime analysis. The lessons will cover concepts, techniques, theories and skills most useful to crime analysts.

Students successfully completing this pass/fail class will develop and/or enhance their skills toolbox. Though this class is not self-paced, students in the class do not meet live at any given time. Rather, assignments, discussion questions/board, a self-grading quiz, PowerPoints, lecture notes, etc. are provided each week covering a given chapter. Students then have a full week to read the weekly course materials, respond on the discussion board, take the quiz, review other materials, links and articles provided, and to submit a weekly assignment. NOTE: This class will be of great interest and specifically benefit those preparing to test for IACA Certification.

Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade. Essential Skills I and II are independent of each other so can be taken in any order.

Texts: Exploring Crime Analysis: Readings on Essential Skills. 3rd Edition (2017) ISBN: 978-1977937186 (Students will need to purchase prior to course start date. See http://iaca.net/exploring_crime_analysis.asp for more info)

Foundations of Crime Analysis

4.5 days (In Person)

Foundations of Crime Analysis explores the basic terms, concepts, and techniques of crime analysis. It is intended for new analysts, officers or executives charged with developing crime analysis programs, or self-taught journeyman analysts looking for formal training.

With a combination of seminar, group projects, and hands-on exercises, the class covers the functions and processes of crime analysis, the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed, proper administration of a crime analysis unit, and pointers for further training and development. The class includes an overview of the more extensive training found in the other IACA Professional Training Series courses.
(This course was formerly titled “Fundamentals of Crime Analysis”; the content has been updated as of 2016 and the name changed to differentiate it from the online class with the same name. The two classes are similar but not exactly the same.)

Texts: All course materials provided

This class is also available in Spanish, however, a translator for the instructor will be required.

Fundamentals of Crime Analysis

12 weeks (Online)

The objective of this 12-week course is to expose students to a variety of analytical techniques utilized in law enforcement to describe and understand crime patterns and trends as they occur. Throughout this course, students will examine concepts; theories, practices, data and analysis techniques associated with the field of crime analysis for law enforcement. Additional topics that will be covered include understanding criminal behavior, behavioral geography, linking crimes, forecasting, and predication. 

Students should expect a time commitment of 3-5 hours per week to gain a pass grade.

Texts: Students will need to purchase their own textbook: Santos, R.S. (2013). Crime Analysis with Crime Mapping (Fourth Edition). Sage Publications (ISBN: 9781506331034)

Microsoft Access for Crime Analysis

4.5 days (In Person)

LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY USES ANALYSIS TO DRIVE EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE DEPLOYMENT STRATEGIES….sounds logical and proactive…BUT, how do you ACCESS and USE all that data!?! Are you struggling with how to pull your data easily from your records’ management system? Do you have your data but have no idea how to ask the right questions of it or create reports for presentation?

Through this training, you will be able to employ more directed policing efforts based on the data…data-driven strategies that are measurable!

BENEFITS – After taking this workshop, you will have:

  • The ability to easily and consistently extract accurate information – no more pulling reports and getting different data.
  • The ability to understand what information you pull.
  • The ability to dig deep into your information for long-term or short-term projects. For example, say you have a rash of vehicles parked in driveways, unlocked, that are targeted during the late shift. Access allows you to just pull those reports (in a second!) and identify hotspots, times, etc. to best deploy officers.
  • The analytical capacity is endless! You will have data at your fingertips. You can run reports on officer time spent at calls, days of week that have the most calls (your specifications) by a time block period, comparisons of previous years (year to date), have information on demand, and so much more!
  • Automated bulletins to save time and supply timely data.

We will explore the basic and intermediate database objects of Microsoft Access, and how to utilize each one with a connection from your records management system. Instruction will specifically include activities on law enforcement-related making and appending tables, developing quality queries, displaying easily readable reports, and employing macros that automate these processes.

**Optional: Please set up remote access to your agency’s data for personalized instruction. Please work with IT staff to set up DDF files for ODBC access.

Texts: course materials provided

Problem Analysis

4.5 days (In Person)

Problem Analysis is a four and a half-day workshop on the skills, knowledge, and abilities necessary for an analyst to identify, analyze, and help an agency solve crime, disorder, and public safety problems.

Students learn how criminology theory, research methods, and statistics are applied at the operational level to examine long-term problems and to recommend effective strategies. The class draws heavily on the applicable Problem-Oriented Policing and Situational Crime Prevention literature but remains analyst-focused.

A capstone project applies the lessons to a real crime or safety problem in the area where the class is held.

Texts: course materials provided

This class is also available in Spanish, however a translator for the instructor will be required.

Tactical Crime Analysis

4.5 days (In Person)

Tactical Crime Analysis is a four and a half-day workshop that trains analysts in the techniques used to identify, analyze, and solve crime patterns and series.

Beginning with the relevant terms and concepts from the Fundamentals course, this class covers the methods used to identify crime patterns as they emerge; the techniques used to analyze them for location, time, victim, offender, and modus operandi; considerations for disseminating information to police; and tactics for offender apprehension, suppression, and opportunity-blocking.

The class uses real examples, hands-on lessons, computer exercises, and a capstone project that will use a range of tactical analysis skills.

Texts: all course materials provided

Refer a Colleague

Let your colleagues know about the benefits of the IACA!